Essay: There’s no democracy of hands but there are many hands in a democracy: ‘City Hall’ (2020) and ‘Her Socialist Smile’ (2020)

To look at the design and flaws of American politics and democracy, Wiseman chooses an entire city and its system as his focal point. Gianvito, on the other hand, chooses a single individual, whose life nevertheless encapsulated a tumultuous early 20th century. Continue reading Essay: There’s no democracy of hands but there are many hands in a democracy: ‘City Hall’ (2020) and ‘Her Socialist Smile’ (2020)

The Value of Intimacy – ‘Divine Love’ and the corporeal cinema of Gabriel Mascaro

by Alonso Aguilar In the oppressive temperatures of rural Brazil, bodies traverse the screen unceremoniously. Detached and absent-minded, different characters go through the motions of hard labor, unfazed by the thick layers of sweat drenching every inch of their clothes. They’re physically present, yet their minds are clearly elsewhere, refusing to be shaped by what they consider to be arbitrary circumstances. Eventually, their shifts end … Continue reading The Value of Intimacy – ‘Divine Love’ and the corporeal cinema of Gabriel Mascaro

On Bodies: ‘The House Is Black’ and the Politics of Corporeal Representation(s)

In his essay “The Queen of Sheba,”1 Iranian critic Hesam Amiri recounts the reactions that The House Is Black (1963) received from reviewers upon its release. The common thread among all of the predominantly negative reviews was that the film was deemed “too feminine” or (contradicting the prior claim) that it was not actually directed by Forough Farrokhzad, but by her partner, the prominent filmmaker and writer Ebrahim Golestan… Continue reading On Bodies: ‘The House Is Black’ and the Politics of Corporeal Representation(s)