Neocolonial Grip: Ousmane Sembène’s ‘Tauw’ (1970) + Djibril Diop Mambéty’s ‘Le Franc’ (1994)

Currency takes even more of a centre stage in some of their lesser-known shorts steeped in acute political commentary: Le Franc (1994) and Tauw (1970) respectively, which delve deeper into many of the context-specific issues of cash—and lack thereof—in Francophone Africa, exposing the incomplete nature of the decolonial project. Continue reading Neocolonial Grip: Ousmane Sembène’s ‘Tauw’ (1970) + Djibril Diop Mambéty’s ‘Le Franc’ (1994)

Bodies De/Materialising: “Passion – Pause – Desire” in Frieda Liappa’s ‘Love Wanders in the Night’ (1981) and ‘The Years of the Big Heat’ (1991)

Ioannis Andronikidis traces the importance of passion, pause and desire through two works by the Greek filmmaker, referencing Audre Lorde, Clarice Lispector and Alain Resnais along the way. Continue reading Bodies De/Materialising: “Passion – Pause – Desire” in Frieda Liappa’s ‘Love Wanders in the Night’ (1981) and ‘The Years of the Big Heat’ (1991)

Prismatic Ground 2022: Select Films of Love and Memory

“Both editions of Prismatic Ground have done well in being an inviting festival space for submitting filmmakers, and in turn this allows for the wide array of programming that necessitates the “wave” format. Online and cinematic presentation together means that while enjoyment of this festival will continue worldwide, presentations on projected film prints will become its newest element, intertwining the global availability of the internet and the togetherness of film screenings for those able to attend.” Continue reading Prismatic Ground 2022: Select Films of Love and Memory

“What a Way to Run a Railroad”—Nothing is Real, not even Cinema, in Tulapop Saenjaroen’s ‘Squish!’

Over the last decade, filmmaker and video artist Tulapop Saenjaroen has been stretching cinema and the short form. Exploring some of the fundamental quandaries of experience: work, play and freedom with a sharp and puckish sense of their history within this long century of moving images. Continue reading “What a Way to Run a Railroad”—Nothing is Real, not even Cinema, in Tulapop Saenjaroen’s ‘Squish!’