Celluloid Now, More Than Ever

by Olivia Hunter Willke On my way home from the first program of the all-analog avant-garde film festival organized by the Chicago Film Society, Celluloid Now, I received the call that my grandmother was dying. The next evening, as I sat watching the beautiful 35mm program unfold, my grandmother was read her last rights and I was confronted by the film III. (2022) by Alexandre … Continue reading Celluloid Now, More Than Ever

Looking for Clues: Mary Helena Clark’s First Films

by Sam Warren Miell At a certain point in the career of an artist, early work will begin to be regarded as a repository of clues to understanding what follows—rough drafts of what will be fully integrated in a ‘mature’ period, that is in turn cast as the fruition of a promise latent or only intermittently present in that early work. If this tendency risks … Continue reading Looking for Clues: Mary Helena Clark’s First Films

Deciphering Death: An Interview with Kateryna Gornostai

by Sofie Topi The Sarajevo Film Festival has built a tradition of picking up strong upcoming voices from South-East Europe and providing a solid network for promising talents and established film professionals. During a quick peek at this year’s CineLink Co-Production Market (the generous platform for projects in development) my eyes caught the name Kateryna Gornostai, the director of Stop-Zemlia, which won the Crystal Bear … Continue reading Deciphering Death: An Interview with Kateryna Gornostai

Tokyo Melody: An Interview with Elizabeth Lennard

by Nel Dahl A rare 16mm print of Elizabeth Lennard’s Tokyo Melody: A Film About Ryuichi Sakamoto (1984) has been unearthed from the filmmaker’s basement for a sold-out screening at Japan Society’s Japan Cuts and is in the process of restoration. As we learn from Lennard herself, the film’s genesis, production, and resulting resonances were full of surprises for both the filmmaker and subject. How … Continue reading Tokyo Melody: An Interview with Elizabeth Lennard

Dancing Towards Oblivion – The Cinema of Teo Hernández

“I was thinking about the movement of my films that seem to shake in a dream linked to the movements of oblivion: it is an agitated, hallucinated movement, a relentless swing… The shaken film emerges from these bruises: from a confrontation between the filmmaker and oblivion. The theme of my films is oblivion, which is why it is inexpressible.” – Teo Hernández Continue reading Dancing Towards Oblivion – The Cinema of Teo Hernández